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special skills

Special Skills You Need to Succeed

There are plenty of people who grow up dreaming of Hollywood glory. Countless children watch award shows on television and see their favorite stars on the red carpet looking glamorous before movie premieres, and they think to themselves, “Someday, I’ll be just like them. Someday I’ll be a famous and beloved actor, recognized by my peers and fans for my skills.” 

But being successful in a business is as competitive as this takes more than just dreams, hopes, and prayers. After all, there are plenty of other actors that have the same training as you. There are even numerous people that have the same physical appearance as you? So, what is it going to take to make you stand out from the others like you? What talents must you have in order to prove that you have what it takes to make it?

Here are some special skills that young actors must possess today in order to be successful in show business:

Craft an Appropriate Resume

It’s hard to prove to a casting director if you are right for a part if they won’t even give your resume a proper review! Make it easy on them and don’t overcrowd your resume with irrelevant work or skills; remember, most decision-makers only have a few seconds to review your resume while you are in the room with them! Just be sure your resume is short and sweet and truly highlights the best parts of your career. 

Work on Your Accents

Now that you have an appropriate resume, it’s time to step into the audition with poise and confidence! Often, that means being able to perform accents of all sorts flawlessly. Having the ability to speak with a believable accent might save a production a lot of money, and it is a skill that can certainly be utilized on several projects in the future. Speaking a foreign language fluently is also potentially relevant when auditioning for a role. 

Think Outside the Box

You never know what hidden talent might be useful for a part, so why not include it (remember, briefly) on your resume? Do you have experience in cheerleading or gymnastics? Mention it? Have you ever played a musical instrument? Say it! Do you have formal training in fencing, martial arts, or stunt work? That’s something a casting director always finds useful. 

When it comes to standing out from the crowd and learning the skills it takes to become a star, trust CGTV to give you proper training and countless opportunities to let your talent shine. CGTV prides itself on providing exemplary customer services and in doing whatever it takes to make sure exceptional young talent is seen and recognized. We take every measure to ensure you are satisfied with all your high-level TV, film, and entertainment program needs and will do whatever it takes to earn your business and remain lifelong clients.  CGTV has been forming exceptional talent in the Los Angeles area; we pride ourselves on being large enough to provide professionalism and reliability, yet small enough to provide personalized service. To discover more about how we can help you become the star you were meant to be, please visit our website today or call us at 818-206-0290.  Like us on Facebook to stay up-to-date on current events, tips, and specials.  

 

Sources:

https://www.backstage.com/magazine/article/special-skills-ones-actor-3893/

https://www.backstage.com/magazine/article/backstage-experts-answer-belongs-actors-resume-9089/

Industry Terms

That’s a Wrap: Knowing Your Industry Terms

By now you know you don’t have to be Emma Stone or Brad Pitt, or have the acting chops of Meryl Streep or Tom Hanks to break into the acting business.  It helps, however, to be informed and educated. One way to get informed is to learn some of the following industry terms:

Above-the-line – Creative talent such as actors, directors, producers, and writers OR the part of the budget which includes costs and fees associated with the above talent.

Actors Equity Association (AEA/ Equity) – A union that has jurisdiction over performers in live stage productions in theaters, such as Broadway and community theater.

Agent – A representative of talent, petitioning on behalf of the talent for work within the entertainment community. Agents, by law, have the right to both solicit employment and negotiate terms for the artists they represent. Not to be confused with manager.

Callback – A follow-up audition, after they have narrowed down the competition.

Call Sheet – The daily schedule of a given production, listing “call times,” actors involved and scenes.

Commercial Agent – an agent that represents talent for television commercials.  This is not to be confused with a print agent which represents models for commercial print ads.

Commercial Modeling – Otherwise known as Print Modeling, this is modeling done for print advertisements, catalogs, etc.

Day Player – An actor who is paid a flat daily rate and generally only has a few lines in the production. Characters that appear in only one scene are generally played by day players. This is sometimes a “step up” for an extra who is asked to read a line on-set.

Dailies – As the film is shot, production and development units view footage the following day. This film stock is known as ‘dailies.’ The producer, director, and various studio department head critically analyze the previous day’s results, looking for any visible problems, from wardrobe to set dressings and performances. In theory, dailies depict the progression of the film in relation to the course of production.

Director – The principal creative artist on a movie set. A director is usually (but not always) the driving artistic source behind the filming process, and communicates to actors the way that he/she would like a particular scene played. A director’s duties might also include casting, script editing, shot selection, shot composition, and editing.

Executive Producer – A producer who is not involved in any technical aspects of the filmmaking process, but who is still responsible for the overall production. Typically an executive producer handles business and legal issues.

Extra – A person who appears in a movie where a non-specific, non-speaking character is required, usually as part of a crowd or in the background of a scene.

Honey Wagon – A vehicle/trailer/truck containing dressing rooms and restrooms.

Line Producer – The hands-on manager of a film set, the line producer organizes the practical aspects of production. Line producers and production managers are responsible for budgeting, scheduling, and implementation.

Pilot -The first episode of a television show or cable show used as a “test run” amongst networks and producers before the show is greenlit.

Pilot Season – The time between around January to about May when pilot episodes are filmed and tested and possibly given the green light to begin production.

Pitch – The meeting held between key players of a film or broadcast literary work. In most cases, this is where the writer(s) attempt to ‘sell’ their product to the producers by explaining why their product should be made by that company into a motion picture.

Slug Line – A header appearing in a script before each scene or shot detailing the location, date and time that the following action is intended to occur.

Taft-Hartley – A federal statute that allows a non-performer to work in a union position without having to first join the union. It is in effect for 30 days from the first day of employment, after which the performer must join the union.

Trailer – An advertisement for a movie which contains scenes from the film.

Treatment – Similar to an outline, a treatment is one of the first steps in developing a project. It adds depth to character and story by filling in missing blanks.

Walk-On – A small acting part which has no lines.

CGTV is a high-level TV, film, and entertainment program designed to help connect talent to the industry. Talent is guided by top celebrities from ABC, NBC, CBS, Disney Channel, and Nickelodeon. Call us or email us! Phone: 818-284-6689 • Email: hollywood@cgtv.la

Acting Talent

Nurturing Your Acting Talent

They say repetition is the mother of perfection.  In other words, the more often you do something or partake in an activity, the better you will become at said activity. Acting is no different than sports or music – practice is key to the development of any skill. Although some people are born with a “gift,” most great actors and actresses are made through discipline and love of their craft. Here are a few more suggestions as to how you can nurture your acting talent and grow as a believable actor or actress.

Acting Talent

Expand Your Horizons

As an actor or actress, you have to be able to experience things from multiple viewpoints. The best way to do so, is to get out and start experiencing as much as you can. Go out and have some fun! Travel when possible. Fall in love. Get a hobby. Remove yourself from the world of casting directors and agents and live like a “civilian” for at least a little while each day. Live your life so when you do book an acting job, you’re able to breathe some of that “life” into your work.

Look & Listen

Although acting is an internal process, it does require a fair amount of observation. Paying attention to human behavior is paramount in being able to act believably. Make “people watching” your research – how they react to different situations, the subtleties in their expressions based on emotions, etc. What separates the “good” from the “great” are these little idiosyncrasies peppered into performances that can only come from observing real-life situations transpire.

Watch & Rewind

Learn from the best with this fun exercise. Put on a movie and closely watch the actors. If you see a scene that truly moves you or resonates with you – rewind it and re-watch. What about their performance is remarkable? What is resonating with you? Next, take note of how they use whatever props are available to them in the scene. Do the props aid in their performance? Remember, learning how to deliver a great performance while also believably playing in a make believe environment takes great skill.

CGTV is a high level TV, film, and entertainment program designed to help connect talent with some of the top agents, casting directors, and managers in Los Angeles. Learn more about the services we provide by visiting the CGTV website or calling 818-284-6689.

 

Sources:

www.CGTV.la

https://childdevelopmentinfo.com/child-activities/4-ways-to-spot-and-nurture-talent-in-your-child/#.Wjgt-9-nGM8

https://www.backstage.com/advice-for-actors/backstage-experts/importance-nurturing-your-talent/

https://www.quora.com/How-can-I-nurture-my-acting-talent-I-have-no-idea-how-or-where-I-can-sell-my-ability-to-act

https://www.wikihow.com/Be-a-Good-Actor-or-Actress

https://www.pexels.com/search/acting/

Actor

How Do I Become a Working Actor?

Becoming an actor involves talent – but hard work, persistence, and industry knowledge are what moves talent into the spotlight. Although the road to being a professional actor can be long, if you have a positive attitude towards learning as much as possible, meeting new people, and loving what you do, the journey itself will often be filled with joyful moments and triumphs.

Actor

Perfecting Your Craft: Never stop learning

Actors and actresses work at expanding their skills, whether they are still waiting for their breakout role or have won multiple awards. One of the challenges (and benefits) of being an actor is that there is always something new to learn or improve upon. Whether you try your hand at improvisational acting, take voice lessons, or give a new type of theater a shot, just about anything you learn will come in handy at some point in your career. Taking summer acting courses, attending acting camps and auditioning are all learning experiences that also give you the opportunity to network with others in the industry.

Networking: Industry connections matter

Acting is a tough road to try to go alone. Making connections with other actors, mentors, agents, and teachers increases your knowledge of the industry, betters your craft, and boosts your chances of being put in touch with a high-quality agent or casting call. Just about everyone in the acting industry has worked hard to get where they are and has wisdom and experience to share.

Persistence Pays: Prepare for hard work and, yes, some rejection

Actors and actresses face rejection, no matter where they are in their career. Whether an agent says “no” to representing you or you’re turned down for a part, perseverance provides an actor with the will to move on and try again. The best way to become an actor is to keep acting, perfect your craft, and avoid becoming discouraged. Good actors treat each professional experience as a learning opportunity, knowing that their love for acting does not hinge on getting one particular role or landing a specific agent, but knowing that the next opportunity for success deserves their best shot.

For more tips and insights on becoming an actor, check out this article!